BIRC

How the Brain Controls Speech

UConn research to better understand how the brain applies meaning to words could ultimately help people with communication disorders. (Christa Tubach/UConn Image)
UConn research to better understand how the brain applies meaning to words could ultimately help people with communication disorders. (Christa Tubach/UConn Image)

Emily Myers, assistant professor of speech, language and hearing sciences at UConn, was recently featured in an article in UConn Today regarding her recent aphasia research in collaboration with Carl Coelho and Jennifer Mozeiko. By using UConn’s powerful new fMRI scanning software, Myers has been able to identify the specific neural regions in the brain that are impacted by aphasia. This new information can help shape therapies for people with language disorders.

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UConn Helps Pave The Way For Assessing Traumatic Brain Injuries

uconn-evaluating-concussions
A device to evaluate concussions is demonstrated by Rohnin Thomas ’17 (CAHNR), left, and Sarah Attansasio ’16 (CAHNR) on Oct. 7, 2015. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

“The device, which is not yet available commercially, is about the size of a smartphone. Placed on a patient’s head, it measures a patient’s electroencephalograph (EEG), or brainwaves, to gauge brain function after head injury…within 10 minutes, the device can help medical personnel determine whether it’s safe for a player who’s had a head injury to return to the athletic field.”

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