Dr. Radenka Maric Graduate Fellowship

Graduate Student Call for Applications:

Dr. Radenka Maric Graduate Fellowship

The Graduate School is sponsoring a new set of fellowships this year. Dr. Radenka Maric Fellowships seek to develop a cohort of students who are looking for connections beyond what they can find in their own department. Ten fellowships will be awarded across the university, with one fellow selected from among the Departments and Programs of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. In addition to a $3,000 stipend, fellowship recipients will be invited to meet together for social, roundtable, and professional development meetings.

 To be eligible for a Maric Fellowship, you must

  1. Be a masters or doctoral student enrolled in The Graduate School
  2. Demonstrate financial need or be meritorious

 In selecting a student for a Maric Fellowship, priority will be given to students who:

  1. Have overcome obstacles such as socioeconomic or educational disadvantage; or,
  2. Are members of groups that are underrepresented at the University of Connecticut; or,
  3. Have experience living or working in diverse environments.

 This is a non-endowed fellowship. It may be renewed annually pending availability of funds and provided that the Fellow continues to meet the criteria above and that the Fellow has participated in activities that The Graduate School organizes for Fellows. 

 Graduate Students interested in applying for the fellowship should provide the following information:

1. A brief summary of financial need and/or accomplishments as a UConn graduate student

 2. A short essay addressing the extent to which you satisfy one or more of the three priority criteria listed above. In the essay, also address how you would benefit from being a part of a supportive cohort.

 3. A letter of support from your graduate advisor or a professor who can speak to your graduate performance at UConn.

 Please submit your application to CLAS@uconn.edu no later than 4pm, October 21.

Postdoctoral Position in Neuroscience of Bilingualism

Postdoctoral Position in Neuroscience of Bilingualism Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland

Applications are invited for a full-time post-doctoral position in the Psychology of Language and Bilingualism Lab at the Institute of Psychology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. The position is funded by the Polish National Science Centre grant Mechanisms of language control underlying bilingual speech production: fMRI investigation (PI: Dr. Zofia Wodniecka; the Co-Investigators are:  Dr. Marcin Szwed(UJ) and Dr. Jakub Szewczyk (University of Illinois) and Dr. Michele Diaz (Penn State University, USA).
 
The project investigates neural bases of language production in bilinguals and its primary methodology is fMRI. The focus will be on Polish-English bilinguals; some knowledge of Polish will be an asset, but is not essential. Most importantly, we are looking for an innovative postdoctoral candidate with a strong background in cognitive neuroscience, computer science or related fields. The length of the appointment will depend on the start date of employment, but at least 2 year commitment is required.  

 Requirements: Candidates must have a Ph.D in Psychology, Neuroscience, Cognitive Science, Computer Science or a related field, or they must have completed the Ph.D by the time of appointment. Other requirements include: prior experience in fMRI and sMRI data acquisition and analyses, strong scientific record (including high quality dissertation, publications in peer-reviewed journals), research interests in neurobiology of cognitive functions,  advanced statistical knowledge, extensive experience in planning and conducting experiments in cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, fluency in English, and a documented ability to work well both independently and in a team. Prior experience in fMRI technique is strongly preferred. Strong statistical and programming skills (including knowledge of Unix commands) is a plus.

 Applications should include: 1) a CV (with min. 3 reference contacts and a publication record); 2) a cover letter with a statement of research experience, interests and the motivation to contribute to the project; 3) a copy of the diploma or statement about the dissertation progress and a planned date of its completion (signed by the Ph.D. supervisor); 4) pdfs of two most important publications.  

 All applications should be sent by October 7th, 2019 to Dr. Zofia Wodniecka at zofia.wodniecka@uj.edu.pl.

 
The start date: AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. Interviews with selected candidates will be held either at the Institute of Psychology or via Skype. For more information about this position, please contact Dr. Zofia Wodniecka.
 
IMPORTANT: An official call for this post can be found under the link. Please note that apart from the documents mentioned above, the candidate will be required to fill in Polish application forms (see the university HR website for details; download and sign the documents that have “Plik doc PL/EN” in the title). 

Call for papers: ECOM’s Inaugural Graduate Conference on 11/15-11/16

Kinds of Knowledge
Call for papers: University of Connecticut: ECOM’s Inaugural Graduate Conference, Nov 15-16, 2019
Deadline: Oct 5, 2019
Keynote Speakers: Fri Nov 15: Prof. Alex Byrne (MIT); Sat Nov 16: Prof. Kristin Andrews (York University)
In several places, the epistemologist Ernie Sosa has distinguished two varieties of knowledge: animal knowledge and reflective knowledge, where “animal knowledge that p does not require that the knower have an epistemic perspective … from which [one] endorses the source of that belief” whereas reflective knowledge “by contrast require such a perspective”. Sosa’s characterization makes it clear that he is concerned to distinguish two varieties of human propositional knowledge (what psychologists label ‘descriptive’ or ‘declarative’ knowledge), as opposed to nonpropositional (‘procedural’) knowledge, sometimes described as ‘knowledge how’. But Sosa’s discussion gives rise to questions that take us beyond human knowledge.
The aim of “Kinds of Knowledge” is to generate interdisciplinary discussion on varieties or types knowledge that are of interest to philosophers, psychologists, linguists, and anthropologists (among others). We encourage contributions that discuss specific types of knowledge that appear to defy traditional epistemological analyses, as well as ones that revisit traditional distinctions pertaining to different ways of knowing in light of new research and insights. Below are examples of potential topics (in no particular order):
  • ‘animal’ vs. ‘reflective’ human knowledge
  • theoretical knowledge that vs. practical knowledge how
  • knowledge who, what, where …
  • knowledge of other minds (incl. ‘theory’-theory vs. simulation theory vs. …)
  • self-knowledge
  • ‘minimal’ knowledge (as merely true belief)
  • the acquisition and development of epistemic notions and competence
  • observational vs. inferential; perceptual knowledge
  • ethical, mathematical, religious, … knowledge – knowledge by description vs. knowledge by acquaintance
  • knowing vs. ‘cognizing’* (*Chomsky’s term for speakers’ cognitive relation to the rules of their language)
  • empirical vs. conceptual knowledge, a posteriori vs. a priori knowledge
  • animal knowledge of ‘affordances’
  • ‘immediate’ vs. inferential vs. testimonial knowledge
  • metacognition

Submission guidelines:

We invite abstracts – 500-1,000 words, excluding references – of short papers, suitable for a 30-35-min presentation, by graduate students and postdocs. The papers should be relatively accessible to an interdisciplinary audience and avoid overly technical discussion of ‘in-house’ issues in epistemology.

Abstracts should be ready for blind review and include the title of the paper; they should make clear both the topic and the main arguments of the paper. Please send a separate cover sheet with the title of the paper, author’s name, affiliation (if any), and contact information.1

Abstracts+cover sheets should be sent to Aliyar Ozercan aliyar.ozercan@uconn.edu by October 5 (midnight). Notifications of acceptance will be sent no later than October 10. Authors of accepted papers will be asked to send a draft of their full paper by November 5th.

——————————-

1 Note: We will be trying to obtain funds to provide modest support for those who need it. Please indicate on the cover sheet whether you have no available funding source to support your travel. Meals while at the conference will be provided. In addition, UConn graduate students will attempt to help contributors find suitable accommodations.

 

Announcing IBACS Fall 2019 Undergraduate Research Grants

We are happy to announce the fifth year of the undergraduate research grant program that is being run by the Connecticut Institute for Brain and Cognitive Sciences (IBACS).

Fall 2019 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH GRANT PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENT:

The application is now open and the deadline will be 11:59 pm on Monday, October 11, 2019. The application process is being conducted in concert with the Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR). It is expected that applicants will be conducting research with IBACS faculty members, focusing on any research area associated with the IBACS mission. Faculty sponsors will need to supply a letter of recommendation. Applicants must fill out the online application, and also submit via the online application, a relatively short research plan (maximum of 6,000 characters, approximately 3 pages) and a budget that explains in detail how the funds will be spent. The application link and faculty recommendation link are listed below. It is recommended that the student first compose the research plan and budget using a word processing program, and then upload the final versions on to the website.

IBACS Fall 2019 application – https://uconn.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bsjpFFwMySHv7OB

IBACS Faculty Recommendation – https://ugradresearch.uconn.edu/ibacs-faculty-form/

THIS PROGRAM IS NOT MEANT TO PROVIDE DIRECT FINANCIAL SUPPORT TO STUDENTS. Instead, it is meant to provide support for the research. The account will be set up with the faculty sponsor after the award is given. It is expected that there will be five awards of up to $1,000. The funding is meant to defray the research-related costs such as materials & supplies, minor equipment, software, animal or participant-related costs. The budget should reflect these expenditures.

Please remember that there will be Spring and Summer 2020 rounds as well. The same student cannot apply for both the Fall and Spring grants, but a recipient of a Fall or Spring grant is eligible for the Summer research grant program, provided that they are still a UCONN student at the time.

CogSci Colloquium: Aaron Shield

The Cognitive Science Colloquium Series is proud to present Aaron Shield, Ph.D.

Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at Miami University of Ohio

Sign Language and Autism at Miami (SL@M) Lab

Friday, November 1st, 4pm, Oak Hall 117

Dr. Shield will provide a talk entitled Insights into cognitive and linguistic processes from research on autism and sign language

Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss how research into the signed languages of the deaf has the power to illuminate big questions about human language. By comparing spoken and signed languages, we gain a better understanding of what language is, how children learn languages, and how to best characterize and treat language disorders. In particular, I will show how research into the acquisition of American Sign Language (ASL) by deaf children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) sheds new light on various questions about acquisition, such as how children imitate linguistic forms, how children use pronouns and other words that refer to self and other, and how language exposure may affect other aspects of cognition.

If you are interested in meeting with Dr. Shield, please contact Dr. Eigsti: inge-marie.eigsti@uconn.edu

Haskins Laboratories Staff Talk on Thursday, September 26 @12:30pm

Please join us in the large conference room for Haskins Staff Talk on Thursday, September 26, 2019 @ 12:30pm

 

Remote access:  https://yale.zoom.us/my/haskins

 

Dr. Michael T. Ullman


Professor, Departments of Neuroscience, Psychology, Linguistics and Neurology
Georgetown University, Washington, DC

 

“Language learning relies on brain circuits that predate humans: Evidence from typical and atypical language development”

 
ABSTRACT:  Increasing evidence suggests that language learning depends importantly on general-purpose learning circuits that pre-existed humans. In particular, research indicates that children learn native languages and adults learn additional languages in evolutionarily ancient circuits that are found in other vertebrates, and are used for a wide range of tasks. For example, birds rely on this circuitry to remember where they stored their hidden acorns, while rats use it to follow rule-governed grooming sequences. Converging evidence from psycholinguistic, neurological, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological studies suggests that humans also rely on these declarative and procedural learning systems for their lexical (word) and grammatical (rule-governed combination) abilities, in specific ways in both first and second language. Newer evidence also suggests that aspects of reading and math may be learned in these systems. Moreover, abnormalities in or compensation by these systems can help explain atypical language and other functions, for example in developmental language disorder and dyslexia. The research has implications not only for understanding the biology and evolution of language and how it is learned, but also for how language learning can be improved, both for people learning a second language and for those with developmental and other disorders.

Ullman Bio:

Dr. Ullman is Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at Georgetown University, with secondary appointments in the Departments of Neurology, Linguistics and Psychology. He is Director of the Brain and Language Laboratory and the Georgetown EEG/ERP Lab. He teaches undergraduate, masters, PhD, and medical students. His research examines the neurocognition of first and second language, math, reading, and memory; how these domains are affected in various disorders (e.g., autism, dyslexia, developmental language disorder, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases); and how they may be modulated by factors such as genetic variability, sex, handedness, and aging.

 

Haskins Staff talks take place at 12:30 pm on Thursday’s in the Main Conference Room (#110)

at Haskins Laboratories 300 George Street, Suite 900 New Haven, CT     http://www.haskinslabs.org/

Post doctoral positions at Indiana–developing visual environments

Post-doctoral fellow position(s) to the study of the natural visual environments of infants and young children and their implications for visual, cognitive and language development and machine learning at Indiana University.    The larger collaborative project involves analyses of the properties of a very large corpus of head camera images (500 million) collected by infants 1 to 24 months of age with respect to low, mid and higher level properties, the examination of the statistical structure of early learned visual categories (and their in-home naming by parents), the design and implementation of computational experiments using machine learning and computer vision models, as well as experiments with infants testing novel predictions from these analyses and models.  The post-doctoral fellow(s) will take part in the intellectually rich cognitive science, computational neuroscience, vision, developmental, and computer science communities at Indiana University under the Emerging Areas of Research Initiative titled Learning: Brains, Machines and Children.  Collaborators on the larger project include Linda Smith, David Crandall, Franco Pestilli, Rowan Candy, Jason Gold, and Chen Yu. 

This is an excellent opportunity for individuals with past training in one or more of the following:  infant statistical learning, infant visual development (including face and object perception), visual neuroscience, adult vision, computer vision. Other areas of training with computational and/or experimental backgrounds will be considered.

Please apply to Linda Smith, smith4@indiana.edu, with Visual Environments in the subject heading by sending a cover letter stating your interest in this project, your cv, and a research statement.  References will be requested after initial contact.

The filling of these position(s) are open in their timing; although we hope to appoint one position this fall, January or this spring are also possible start dates. 

Linda B. Smith
Distinguished Professor
Psychological and Brain Sciences
1101 East 10th Street
Indiana University
Bloomington IN 47405

PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT: FALL 2019 IBACS UNDERGRADUATE GRANTS

We are happy to announce the fifth year of the undergraduate research fellowship program that is being run by the Connecticut Institute for Brain and Cognitive Sciences (IBACS).

Fall 2019 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENT:

The opening date for submission of applications will be Monday, September 23, 2019, and the deadline will be 11:59 pm on Monday, October 11, 2019. The application process is being conducted in concert with the Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR). It is expected that applicants will be conducting research with IBACS faculty members, focusing on any research area associated with the IBACS mission. Faculty sponsors will need to supply a letter of recommendation. Applicants must fill out the online application, and also submit via the online application, a relatively short research plan (maximum of 6,000 characters, approximately 3 pages) and a budget that explains in detail how the funds will be spent. The application link and faculty recommendation link are listed below. It is recommended that the student first compose the research plan and budget using a word processing program, and then upload the final versions on to the website. Links for uploading the applications and faculty recommendations will be provided in the next announcement.

IBACS Fall 2019 application – Will become available on 9/23/19

IBACS Faculty Recommendation –Will become available on 9/23/19

THIS PROGRAM IS NOT MEANT TO PROVIDE DIRECT FINANCIAL SUPPORT TO STUDENTS. Instead, it is meant to provide support for the research. The account will be set up with the faculty sponsor after the award is given. The award will be for up to $1,000. The funding is meant to defray the research-related costs such as materials & supplies, minor equipment, software, animal or participant-related costs. The budget should reflect these expenditures.

Also, please remember that there will be Spring and Summer 2020 grants as well. The same student cannot apply for both the Fall and Spring grants, but a recipient of a Fall or Spring grant is eligible for the Summer grant program, provided that they are still a UCONN student at the time.

 

SAVE THE DATE: Neuroscience at Storrs Symposium, October 29th, 2019

Dear Colleagues,
On behalf of the Neuroscience Steering Committee, you are cordially invited to the 23rd ANNUAL NEUROSCIENCE AT STORRS SYMPOSIUM on Tues, October 29th, 2019 from 3:30 pm-8:30 pm in Dodd / Bousfield on the Storrs campus.

This annual event brings together the neuroscience community at UConn from across diverse departments and schools including the departments of Physiology and Neurobiology, Psychological Sciences, Neuroscience (UCHC), Biomedical Engineering, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Electrical and Computer Engineering and The Connecticut Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences.

As our Keynote Speaker this year, we are lucky to host Dr. Marina Picciotto, the Charles B. G. Murphy Professor of Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Neuroscience.

In addition, we will be holding a data blitz (short-format podium presentation), poster session and reception. Students and postdoctoral fellows are enthusiastically encouraged to participate in the poster and data blitz presentations (with prizes!). Further details and sign-ups to follow. 

Please share this invitation with faculty members, students, postdoctoral fellows and scholars in your Department/Institute. Further details, along with a poster to distribute, will follow later in the month. 

For general inquiries about the event, please contact Dr. Alex Jackson (alexander.jackson@uconn.edu) in the Dept. of Physiology and Neurobiology. 

We look forward to your participation!

Sincerely,

Alex
————————————————————–

Alexander C. Jackson, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Physiology and Neurobiology
University of Connecticut
Torrey Life Science, Rm 115
Storrs, CT, 06269