Author: Rodriguez, Atziri

2/17:Postdoctoral Research Position

Postdoctoral Research Position

Overview

Prof. Adele Goldberg invites applications for a postdoctoral research position to work on the role of generalization in language learning among individuals on the autism spectrum. The lab conducts research using a variety of methods, including lab-based experiments, online surveys, pupillometry, ERP and fMRI to study factors that influence the learning and use of language in neurotypical and atypical children and adults. The successful candidate will focus on autism research and will assist in other projects that range from conventional metaphor processing to diachronic change.

 

This is a one-year term position with the possibility of renewal contingent upon continued funding and satisfactory performance. Start date is negotiable. Please submit a CV, a cover letter describing research goals, and technical and research skills. Please also submit contact information for three references. Contact Adele Goldberg (adele@princeton.edu) for additional questions.

 

Qualifications

  • A recent Ph.D. in psychology, linguistics or related discipline
  • Experience designing and publishing experimental work
  • Expertise in statistics for language work (using R)
  • Excellent organizational, interpersonal, and communication skills
  • Experience or strong interest in working with populations on the autism spectrum
  • Detail-oriented, motivated, efficient, and able to work independently
  • Strong writing skill

 

This position is subject to the University’s background check policy. Princeton University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

CogSci Colloquium: Joseph Henrich & Barbara Rogoff on 2/26

WEIRD problems and potential solutions 

 

Since its inception, psychology’s Western-centric bias has been an impediment to a deeper understanding of human cognition. Our speakers argue that it is time for a radical transformation of social scientific research, and our understanding of human nature as a whole. 

 

The Cognitive Science Colloquium Series is proud to jointly present Joseph Henrich and Barbara Rogoff 

 

Friday, February 26th, from 2pm – 4:30pm, virtually via Zoom  

 

https://zoom.us/j/4361587368?pwd=NGova2g2RGlKUC9iRXRLQkxoOW1Mdz09 

Meeting ID: 436 158 7368 

Passcode: CogSci 

2.00 pm 

W.E.I.R.D. Minds 

Joseph Henrich, Professor and Chair of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard 

 

Over the last few decades, a growing body of research has revealed not only substantial global variation along several important psychological dimensions, but also that people from societies that are Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich and Democratic (WEIRD) are particularly unusual, often anchoring the ends of global psychological distributions. To explain these patterns, I’ll first show how the most fundamental of human institutions—those governing marriage and the family—influence our motivations, perceptions, intuitions and emotions. Then, to explain the peculiar trajectory of European societies over the last two millennia, I lay out how one particular branch of Christianity systematically dismantled the intensive kin-based institutions in much of Latin Christendom, thereby altering people’s psychology and opening the door to the proliferation of new institutional forms, including voluntary associations (charter towns, universities and guilds), impersonal markets, individualistic religions and representative governments. In light of these findings, I close by arguing that the anthropological, psychological and economic sciences should transform into a unified evolutionary approach that considers not only how human nature influences our behavior and societies but also how the resulting institutions, technologies and languages subsequently shape our minds.  

 

3.15 pm 

What is learning? Cultural perspectives 

Barbara Rogoff, UCSC Foundation Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of California in Santa Cruz 

 

Many people who have spent decades in Western schools take for granted a particular way of thinking of learning — as either receiving transmitted bits of information or acquiring it from an external world. In this presentation, I will argue for a paradigm shift, to seeing learning as a process of growth, as people transform their ways of participating in ongoing endeavors to become more competent and helpful contributors to the collective good of all, across time. My perspective is inspired and informed by research observations of a prevalent way of learning in many Indigenous-heritage communities of the Americas — Learning by Observing and Pitching In to family and community endeavors (LOPI). I will discuss some implications of these ways of conceiving of learning, based in studies of how Indigenous American communities often organize children’s learning, with associated distinctions in children’s helpfulness, ways of collaborating, and ways of learning. 

Both speakers will join us in a GatherTown social following the event. Spots are limited to 10 graduate students and 10 faculty on a first come, first serve basis. Please email Dimitris Xygalatas, xygalatas@uconn.edu, if you are interested. 

If you’d like to meet individually with Dr. Henrich during the day on 2/26, please email Dimitris Xygalatas, xygalatas@uconn.edu. If you’d like to meet with Dr. Rogoff, please email Letty Naigles, letitia.naigles@uconn.edu

Responses for both GatherTown and one-on-ones are needed by Friday, 2/19